Now Hiring for Clinical Decision Unit

Now Hiring for Clinical Decision Unit

The Clinical Decision Unit (CDU) of Northeastern Health System will provide evaluation and care of patients whose medical needs can most often be taken care of within a 24-hour time frame. A patient in the CDU receives monitoring, diagnostic testing, therapy and assessment of symptoms to determine whether he or she will require further treatment as an inpatient or can be safely discharged from the hospital setting. If a patient is deemed medically stable, he or she may be discharged from the CDU at any time during the day or evening. Examples of conditions treated in the Clinical Decision Unit include: Chest pain Asthma Abdominal pain Dehydration Who provides care and medical treatment?  Patients in the Clinical Decision Unit are cared for by highly skilled professionals. These include, but are not limited to: A Hospitalist physician (MD or DO) has overall responsibility for a patient’s care. Every patient is seen by a physician. They talk with the nurses, evaluate the patient and any test results, and confer with other doctors as necessary to determine a course of treatment. A registered nurse (RN) will assess and monitor a patient’s physical condition, give medication, maintain an IV and keep family and/or friends informed of any tests and procedures. Nurses also provide important discharge information before patients go home. Each nurse is responsible for several patients and works very closely with other doctors as necessary to determine a course of treatment. Nurse practitioners, licensed practical care nurses, and case managers are also active participants in a patient’s care. To apply, or for more information, contact our Human Resources department at (918) 453-2170 or visit http://nhs-ok.org/index.php/jobs/. Share...
Weight Loss Leads to Cancer Discovery

Weight Loss Leads to Cancer Discovery

Kelly Goldman was feeling great after her recent 15 pound weight loss. Then, while changing into a sports bra, she discovered a lump in her breast leading to her battle against breast cancer. “I attribute my weight loss to helping the lump become more noticeable,” said Goldman. “I had not had my mammogram that year and actually completely forgot. That won’t happen again.” Goldman was diagnosed with Triple Negative Breast Cancer, Stage 2, unilateral. “I had a strong feeling it was cancerous, knowing it was not painful at first and wasn’t there before,” said Goldman. As a former radiological technician, Goldman was knowledgeable about the possible signs and symptoms of cancer. “I can honestly say I wished I did not know as much as I did, medically that is,” said Goldman. “I wanted to be just a regular person with no idea of what was to come or expect. I didn’t wanted to know the worst case scenario. I was in shock, and scared to put my children and husband through what was to come.” Goldman contacted her healthcare provider and received a mammogram which confirmed the mass. She then had a biopsy preformed, which confirmed the cancer.   From there, Goldman saw an oncologist who informed her she would need radiation and chemotherapy, as well as a lumpectomy or mastectomy. She chose the lumpectomy, as the survival rate was the same.   Goldman was able to receive both her chemotherapy and radiation treatments in Tahlequah, thanks to the partnerships created through Northeastern Health System. “I received my chemotherapy from Warren Clinic Medical Oncology-Tahlequah office, and the Northeastern Health System...
Northeastern Health System offers Mammography Special

Northeastern Health System offers Mammography Special

In recognition of October being Breast Cancer Awareness month, Northeastern Health System is offering mammogram screenings for a flat fee of $75. The focus of this annual effort is to educate women, and those who love them, about the important benefits of early breast cancer detection. “Unfortunately, too many women fail to receive their annual mammography screenings,” said Misty Brenan, NHS mammography technologist. “In some cases, this can be attributed to a lack of education. There are still some people who do not understand the importance of mammography in early breast cancer detection.   Other women avoid the annual tests because they are afraid; scared that the test itself will hurt or afraid of receiving possible bad news.” The messages for National Breast Cancer Awareness Month are important: Early detection saves lives. Mammography screening is the single most effective method of early detection. An annual mammogram is recommended for all women over 40 years of age. Women should know how their breasts normally feel and should report any changes to their health care provider. Breast self-examinations (monthly from age 20) and clinical examinations (at least every three years from age 20 to 35, and annually from age 40 and up) should be a part of regular breast health screenings.“Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women,” said Branan. “Finding a tumor at its earliest stages and getting appropriate treatment not only provides the best chance of surviving a breast cancer diagnosis, but also provides the broadest range of effective treatment options.”Estrogen-Related Risk Factors: In addition to the inherited higher risk from a “breast cancer” gene, a number of other...
NHS Nurse Uses Cancer Experience to Help Others

NHS Nurse Uses Cancer Experience to Help Others

In June of 2015, Licensed Practical Nurse Kelly Hatley, discovered a lump in her breast. The lump grew rapidly, prompting Hatley to contact her physician and schedule a mammogram, an X-ray of the breast used to detect cancer. The results would lead her on a life-changing path and fight against breast cancer. “I went in for a needle biopsy in late August 2015, with a negative result.  I then went in for a lumpectomy on September 18, 2015, with a positive result of cancer,” said Hatley. A few days later she was diagnosed with Stage II, Invasive Ductal Carcinoma – Breast Cancer. On October 20, 2015, she underwent a bilateral mastectomy followed by chemotherapy and radiation. Hatley received her chemo treatments at the chemotherapy center at Northeastern Health System. “I had four rounds, every other week, of AC chemotherapy, and 6 rounds of T,” said Hatley. “I was scheduled for 12 rounds of T, but neuropathy set in my fingers and toes so I had to end early.” An AC-T regimen is an abbreviation for a chemotherapy combination used to treat breast cancer. It includes drugs doxorubicin hydrochloride and cyclophosphamide, followed by treatment with paclitaxel. Following chemotherapy, Hatley underwent 33 radiation treatments at Northeast Oklahoma Cancer Center at Northeastern Health System, where she now works helping other cancer patients. “My experience at NHS was a very good experience.   I could not ask for better treatment.  The staff that took care of me, my supervisors, co-workers and others, treated me with sincere kindness,” said Hatley. “As for how I felt? Initially I was mad, upset, going through the grieving process...
Harp Named New NHS Laboratory Director

Harp Named New NHS Laboratory Director

After 38 years of service, Northeastern Health System’s Lab Director, Clint Horn, retired. Filling Horn’s vacated seat is Melissa Harp. Harp, a Medical Laboratory Scientist (MLS), brings a wide variety of skills and assets to the NHS team. “I have great respect for Clint Horn, who preceded me,” said Harp. “As well as a colleague, Clint is a fellow church member. I’m definitely interested in being part of a team that employed him for 38 years. I am blessed to have him remain as a consultant to help me transition.” When deciding her career path, Harp chose to follow the family business, as many of her family members have made careers in the medical field. “I come from a healthcare family. My dad is a retired MLS, and my mom is a retired LPN. My sister Jennifer is an RN at NHS. It is in my genes,” said Harp. Harp’s 18 years of experience in the laboratory include being the microbiology supervisor with Indian Health Service. She also has a good amount of experience in hematology and is proficient in infectious diseases. “I have worked in all areas of the lab,” said Harp. “Microbiology and Hematology are my passions.” Harp earned her bachelor’s degree in Medical Laboratory Science from Northeastern State University in 2000, and completed her internship at St. Francis Hospital School of Medical Technology, and is fortunate to have had a large support system along the way. “My dad, David Hayes, he raised me to be curious about the world and let me look into his microscope as a young child. I take after him with a...
Couple Celebrates Anniversary in Hospital

Couple Celebrates Anniversary in Hospital

Happy 52nd Anniversary to Dennis and Susan Harrison. Little did they know, they would be spending their anniversary in the Cardiovascular ICU at Northeastern Health System. Dennis underwent quadruple bypass surgery this week and is recovering nicely. “We are thrilled with everyone we have encountered here,” said Susan. “They have all been wonderful.” “They really have been good to us,” added Dennis. “They go the extra step to help you. When asked what the secret to a lasting marriage is, Susan said, “Lots of patience,” to which Dennis added, “I do what I’m told!” Happy anniversary you two from all of us at NHS! Share...